Hotline: 805-543-9453 (WILD)

Who We Are

800+ strong and growing!  
Members, donors, volunteers & staff working together to support the wildlife of San Luis Obispo County through rehabilitation and educational outreach.

Pacific Wildlife Care is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization.

What We Do

We treat nearly 3,000 wild animal patients every year, from over 200 different species. Our goal? To return healthy animals to the wild! We also provide educational presentations for local organizations and schools.

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Why It Matters

[Wildlife rehabilitation] "is a process of coming to know something quite unlike you, to understand it well enough not only to keep it alive but also to put it back, like a puzzle piece, into the gap in the world it left behind."

 -- Helen Macdonald, author of H is for Hawk

Volunteer

Register to attend a volunteer opportunities orientation (VOO)  and start making a difference in the well being of our local wildlife. Check out our event calendar for the next VOO.

Our Stories

Volunteers, supporters, and wildlife advocates share heartfelt, memorable stories...

Archives

PWC - In the News!

Check out the latest news coverage and podcasts!
Here...

10 hours ago

Pacific Wildlife Care

Update! The two orphaned Great Horned Owls that were separated from their parents on a hay truck are doing great. They have doubled in size and are voracious eaters. When they are old enough, they will be moved to a large flight cage where they will learn how to fly and catch live prey.
To help us continue the work of rehabilitating and releasing sick, injured, and orphaned wildlife, please consider making a donation or becoming a member. We receive no government funding and rely on donations/memberships to keep us running. Thank you!!
www.pacificwildlifecare.org/make-a-donation/

#greathornedowl #owls #wildliferehab #wildlife #pacificwildlifecare
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Update! The two orphaned Great Horned Owls that were separated from their parents on a hay truck are doing great. They have doubled in size and are voracious eaters. When they are old enough, they will be moved to a large flight cage where they will learn how to fly and catch live prey. 
To help us continue the work of rehabilitating and releasing sick, injured, and orphaned wildlife, please consider making a donation or becoming a member. We receive no government funding and rely on donations/memberships to keep us running. Thank you!!
https://www.pacificwildlifecare.org/make-a-donation/

#greathornedowl #owls #wildliferehab #wildlife #pacificwildlifecare

 

Comment on Facebook

They’re beautiful

... they are just the cutest!

Thank you

They are so beautiful. I just love them. Thank you for sharing

Raptors offer free, non-toxic rodent control. Please do not use rodent poison- it kills them too!

Raptorsarethesolution.org
#RATS #raptorsarethesolution #saynotopoison #wildlife #rodentcontrol
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Raptors offer free, non-toxic rodent control. Please do not use rodent poison- it kills them too! 

Raptorsarethesolution.org
#RATS #raptorsarethesolution #saynotopoison #wildlife #rodentcontrol

 

Comment on Facebook

This has been known for over 40-60 years wth is people thinking using poison near wildlife areas.

2 days ago

Pacific Wildlife Care

National Geographic
Bobcats usually hunt at night, but this cat made an exception to take advantage of salmon spawning season.
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National Geographic

 

Comment on Facebook

Lane Garrison so cool!

He makes it look so easy...I could stand there all day with a fishing pole and not catch a thing 🙂

JT Teel pretty sure Turkey is part bobcat.

Teddy Whaling

Clayton Whaling

Clay Magnet

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Nat Geo Wild
Dozens of albatrosses received artificial nests to help them cope with climate change.
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Nat Geo Wild

 

Comment on Facebook

Max good job humans! 😍

people??? this is what matters

Susie Michaelson Burbidge Might want to post this on LPC page. They learned from us!

Freedom Friday! These 4 Brush Rabbits made their way back into the wild after being brought to us as babies. They all had wounds from being caught by cats. Cat bites are deadly if not treated with antibiotics and we are still not always able to save the cat-injured wildlife we receive. These rabbits were given a course of antibiotics and raised until they were old enough for release. We love our kitty friends but please keep your cats indoors-- it is safer for them and for wildlife.

#freedomfriday #backtothewild #homesweethome #rabbits #wildlife
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View on Facebook

 

Comment on Facebook

Amen to keeping the kitties indoors. Safer for them, as well as the local critters.

Tough sell to get people to understand why cats should be kept indoors. Even bird lovers argue against it 😞

My two are indoor cats! they can’t hurt any wildlife and they are safe as well!

cute

I hate cats

my dog loves this !

Becker Cox Christine Wallace

Hop free little bun-buns! Yay!

Awww...uh oh, I think the female is pregnant already 😂

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