Who We Are

800+ strong and growing!  
Members, donors, volunteers & staff working together to support the wildlife of San Luis Obispo County through rehabilitation and educational outreach.

Pacific Wildlife Care is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization.

What We Do

We treat nearly 3,000 wild animal patients every year, from over 200 different species. Our goal? To return healthy animals to the wild! We also provide educational presentations for local organizations and schools.

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Why It Matters

[Wildlife rehabilitation] "is a process of coming to know something quite unlike you, to understand it well enough not only to keep it alive but also to put it back, like a puzzle piece, into the gap in the world it left behind."

 -- Helen Macdonald, author of H is for Hawk

Volunteer

Due to Covid-19  restrictions, our regular volunteer opportunities orientations (VOO) are temporarily suspended. You will be contacted with updated information when you fill out the VOO registration form.

Our Stories

Volunteers, supporters, and wildlife advocates share heartfelt, memorable stories...

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PWC - In the News!

Check out the latest news coverage and podcasts!
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13 hours ago

Pacific Wildlife Care

Wishing all our human and wildlife dads a Happy Father's Day! On this Father's Day, we also celebrate American Eagle Day. Just like their human counterparts, the Bald Eagle dad helps to raise its young with his life partner. With their major food source being fish, let’s help these fathers raise their families by joining the efforts of a park or beach cleanup day and ensure the proper disposal of fishing line and hooks near our bodies of water.

A special thanks to wildlife photographer, Donald Quintana, for this photo of a pair of Bald Eagles — www.donaldquintana.com

#HappyFathersDay #NationalEagleDay #AmericanEagleDay #BaldEagle #Wildlife
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Wishing all our human and wildlife dads a Happy Fathers Day! On this Fathers Day, we also celebrate American Eagle Day. Just like their human counterparts, the Bald Eagle dad helps to raise its young with his life partner. With their major food source being fish, let’s help these fathers raise their families by joining the efforts of a park or beach cleanup day and ensure the proper disposal of fishing line and hooks near our bodies of water.  

A special thanks to wildlife photographer, Donald Quintana, for this photo of a pair of Bald Eagles — www.donaldquintana.com

#HappyFathersDay #NationalEagleDay #AmericanEagleDay #BaldEagle #Wildlife

A special wildlife release and story by one of our volunteers…

Substitute Dad

Many folks, even beachcombers, never glimpse a Common Murre. If they come upon one on a beach, it is because the bird is sick, injured, oiled, or emaciated. But in less than two weeks, members of the public had found three young stranded Common Murres – two fledglings and a juvenile – and brought them to PWC.

There is nothing common about Common Murres, who spend most of their lives in the ocean, diving like jet planes underwater to forage for fish. They come to solid ground only to nest, in densely packed colonies called “loomeries” on bare, rocky cliff edges.

From a human point of view, murres are real charmers. Standing upright in black and white plumage, these oceanic birds look like a northern version of a penguin, although they are actually large auks. Before they can even fly, baby murres fledge by flinging themselves from their rocky birthplace into the water below, where the father is waiting. Young murres spend the next two months with papa, learning the ropes, so to speak, of life in the ocean.

At PWC, the young murres were diagnosed with various disorders and problems. All were dehydrated, two had an infestation of flagellates (parasites), one had lice, and one was heavily oiled. This one was washed. They were all given fluids, treated with medications, and fed fish. But what could be the future for three young fatherless murres?

One month later, another Common Murre arrived at PWC – a heavily oiled adult who, after being washed, appeared “unusually high-stressed” and didn’t “seem to be preening,” says Clinic Director Vann Masvidal. He thought this murre “might benefit from joining other Common Murres.”

As luck would have it, there were three in an outdoor pool.

The outcome? The adult perked up. The youngsters gained a role model and guide. Two weeks later, Rescue/Transport Team members Morgan Nolan and Kathy Simpson were tasked with releasing all four together. Captain Becka Kelly ferried them on a Harbor Patrol boat out to the ocean, where four uncommon birds were returned to their natural habitat.

To honor all the dads in your life and to make releases like this possible, please consider donating to our fundraiser to help feed, medicate, and care for the hundreds of wildlife babies this season. Click here—> www.facebook.com/donate/4287605164623615/

Story by: Pam Hartman

#FreedomFriday #CommonMurre #WildlifeRelease #WildlifeRehab #BackToTheWild #HomeSweetHome #FathersDay #CommonMurrePWC
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Comment on Facebook

There is healing and learning to be around your own kind, this is a wonderful outcome

Great job everyone! Just listen to those happy vocalizations! What a wonderful release.

It’s snack time for Penny our educational opossum! Her favorite snacks are grapes and avocado 🥑 🍇. Unfortunately, Penny is not releasable due to a head injury after a dog attack but she now has the chance to educate the public on how awesome opossums are. 🙂 Opossums may look scary to some but they mean you no harm. They are easily frightened but when cornered will show their teeth and growl. Please just leave them alone and let them go on their way... they have an important job to do eating all the snails, slugs, and ticks from your yard!

#Opossum #AwesomeOpossum #WildlifeEducation #PleaseBeKind
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Comment on Facebook

I love how they smack their food. Sounds like my son when he eats. 🤣🤣🤣

Back when I was a rehabber with your group, late 80's..I housed Posey the possum and Hoot the great horned owl. Those were the good old days

They each have their own personality and like certain foods and not others - just like our kids! Except: opossums groom & clean themselves (I doubt my sons would have done that if I hadn't insisted on nightly baths!)

So adorable!

She’s precious!

Mariana Trejo ❤️❤️

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Found a fawn? Call us if you are in San Luis Obispo county before intervening- 805-543-9453. Thank you!Have you found a fawn in your yard? If you've found a fawn, here are a few things to keep in mind!

Does will leave their fawns for 12 hours or more at a time. They're designed to stay down and quiet to hide from predators until mom returns. Mom often leaves them close to homes (even right along your house or garden) as these areas tend to be safer from their native predators. Mom will return for them when she can see the area is safe – not if you're out standing with them.

If you find a fawn that appears uninjured and is alert, that fawn is fine! If you have already interfered, please place the fawn down where you found it.

If you find a fawn that has visible injuries, is laying on its side, or has visible discharge from the eyes or nose, please call the Center and we can help you choose the next best step. “Curled ear tips” are not an appropriate indication of a fawn needing help, despite being a widespread myth on social media.

Even if you find a confirmed orphaned fawn (dead mother with it), it may not need assistance! Other lactating does will often “adopt” babies in need as did the doe photographed below. This specific doe was living in and around a staff member’s yard with her singleton and the smaller fawn’s mother was hit by a vehicle. Our staff member let the orphan cry in the yard and saw the doe approach with her fawn and allow the crying baby to nurse – this family of three stayed together for the remainder of the season.

If you have any questions about a fawn, please call before intervening!

#IfYouCareLeaveThemThere #WhiteTailedDeer #Fawns #WildlifeRehab
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Found a fawn? Call us if you are in San Luis Obispo county before intervening- 805-543-9453. Thank you!

Comment on Facebook

Just spotted a doe and her 2 fawns at our seasonal pond (empty for years due to drought). We've been keeping a blue kiddie pool down there close to our well and we kept it filled with fresh water from the well's hose bib. Thanks for stressing the importance of letting fawns stay where their mom leaves them!

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