Hotline: 805-543-9453 (WILD)

Who We Are

800+ strong and growing!  
Members, donors, volunteers & staff working together to support the wildlife of San Luis Obispo County through rehabilitation and educational outreach.

Pacific Wildlife Care is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization.

What We Do

We treat nearly 3,000 wild animal patients every year, from over 200 different species. Our goal? To return healthy animals to the wild! We also provide educational presentations for local organizations and schools.

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Why It Matters

[Wildlife rehabilitation] "is a process of coming to know something quite unlike you, to understand it well enough not only to keep it alive but also to put it back, like a puzzle piece, into the gap in the world it left behind."

 -- Helen Macdonald, author of H is for Hawk

Volunteer

Register to attend a volunteer opportunities orientation (VOO)  and start making a difference in the well being of our local wildlife. Check out our event calendar for the next VOO.

Our Stories

Volunteers, supporters, and wildlife advocates share heartfelt, memorable stories...

Archives

PWC - In the News!

Check out the latest news coverage and podcasts!
Here...

6 hours ago

Pacific Wildlife Care

Save the date for Soupabration - November 4. Great soups, wine, Animal Ambassadors, and support for the only group in San Luis Obispo County providing local care for injured and orphaned wildlife.

Get you tickets here: soupabration.comPacific Wildlife Care updated the raccoon cage a bit to provide even more climbing, digging, and natural behaviors for the raccoons. These youngsters are still learning how to be wild raccoons but should be released soon! YOUR SUPPORT AT SOUPABRATION! HELPS MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

#raccoons #wildliferehab #keepthemwild
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Save the date for Soupabration - November 4.  Great soups, wine, Animal Ambassadors, and support for the only group in San Luis Obispo County providing local care for injured and orphaned wildlife.

Get you tickets here: soupabration.com

 

Comment on Facebook

very cool ladder

11 hours ago

Pacific Wildlife Care

We’ve updated our raccoon cage a bit to provide even more climbing, digging, and natural behaviors for our raccoons. These youngsters are still learning how to be wild raccoons but should be released soon!

#raccoons #wildliferehab #keepthemwild
... See MoreSee Less

We’ve updated our raccoon cage a bit to provide even more climbing, digging, and natural behaviors for our raccoons. These youngsters are still learning how to be wild raccoons but should be released soon!

#raccoons #wildliferehab #keepthemwild

 

Comment on Facebook

stay safe babies

I miss my little coons❤ they look so happy

They are so fascinating to watch.

Do you have suggestions to deture the little ones from coming into the house through the cat doors for midnight cat food.....it just started happening a couple weeks ago, they are still terrified of us, but hiding the food doesnt stop them

Regina Fallon after huskies we are moving on to racoons 😍😍😍😍

Christina M Heasley Alanah Tucker Lauren Shand Liz Roberts

+ View previous comments

4 days ago

Pacific Wildlife Care

Learning about the physical adaptations of wildlife is fascinating stuff and a topic we like discussing in our education programs. One of our favorite adaptations to talk about are the baffles that Falcons have in their nares (bird nostrils)..
This is Gavin, our Peregrine Falcon ambassador who is not releasable due to a wing fracture that did not heal correctly. Notice the little point in the center of his nare? That is actually a boney structure called a ‘baffle’ which allows air to circulate properly through the lungs & air sacs so the bird can breathe while sustaining speeds over 200mph. Have you ever stuck your head out of a moving car window and tried to breathe but instead choked on air? The same thing used to happen to airplane turbines that exceeded certain speeds in the 1950’s & 60’s before engineers applied this baffle system to all modern-day jets. This method of incorporating designs from nature into modern engineering is called biomimicry. So the next time you fly in an airplane you can thank falcons for its efficiency!
#Falcon #AmazingNature #Biomimicry #PeregrineFalcon
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Freedom Friday! This Western Screech Owl was found on the side of the road most likely having been hit by a car. An examination by our veterinarian revealed a broken leg which was successfully treated. He spent some time healing and recovering in our flights and is now back in his home territory 🙂. Good luck out there little yet fierce owl!

#homesweethome #freedomfriday #wildliferelease #screechowl
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Comment on Facebook

thank you for saving the beautiful owls!