Hotline: 805-543-9453 (WILD)

Who We Are

800+ strong and growing!  
Members, donors, volunteers & staff working together to support the wildlife of San Luis Obispo County through rehabilitation and educational outreach.

Pacific Wildlife Care is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization.

What We Do

We treat nearly 3,000 wild animal patients every year, from over 200 different species. Our goal? To return healthy animals to the wild! We also provide educational presentations for local organizations and schools.

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Why It Matters

[Wildlife rehabilitation] "is a process of coming to know something quite unlike you, to understand it well enough not only to keep it alive but also to put it back, like a puzzle piece, into the gap in the world it left behind."

 -- Helen Macdonald, author of H is for Hawk

Volunteer

Register to attend a volunteer opportunities orientation (VOO)  and start making a difference in the well being of our local wildlife. Check out our event calendar for the next VOO.

Our Stories

Volunteers, supporters, and wildlife advocates share heartfelt, memorable stories...

Archives

PWC - In the News!

Check out the latest news coverage and podcasts!
Here...

48 minutes ago

Pacific Wildlife Care

Make sure to secure your trash or you may have unwanted visitors! Attracting wildlife into our neighborhoods exposes them to harm from dogs, cars and other dangers. Keep them wild to keep them safe. ... See MoreSee Less

Make sure to secure your trash or you may have unwanted visitors! Attracting wildlife into our neighborhoods exposes them to harm from dogs, cars and other dangers. Keep them wild to keep them safe.

 

Comment on Facebook

Trash panda!

1 day ago

Pacific Wildlife Care

Some think their balloons can't travel to the ocean & beyond just because they live inland.... ... See MoreSee Less

 

Comment on Facebook

I think it should be illegal to release balloons into the air. Too many animals are killed by the string or the balloon itself.

2 days ago

Pacific Wildlife Care

Since the California condor population has officially reached over 450 individuals, we have decided to highlight some special condors that have exemplified what it has taken and what it has meant for that incredible accomplishment to have happened. Each month we're profiling a different condor and to kick things off we've decided to start with a condor to truly demonstrates what recovery means.
Female condor #289 is officially our first Condor of the Month! Back in 2013 #289 was spotted on top of the Bitter Creek National Wildlife Refuge flight pen, where she suddenly had a seizure and fell off. Once it was determined that she was still alive, she was quickly trapped and taken down to the Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens where she was diagnosed with severe lead toxicosis. Her mate and fledgling were missing in the wild, presumed to have died from lead poisoning, and #289 was most likely within a week of succumbing herself. The effects of the lead poisoning reduced #289 to half of her weight, and she took an entire year to recover, a recovery that was only possible thanks to a very talented and dedicated veterinary and keeper team.
Her recovery was the longest recovery from lead toxicosis up to that point, but the following year she was released back into the wild. In 2015 and 2016, #289 attempted to nest but was unsuccessful each time. Her mate went missing in the wild in 2016, but it looks like she may have recently paired up with a male that has lost his last two mates as well. Hopefully 2018 will prove to be a successful year for both of them.

#CondorOfTheMonth #FemaleFriday
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Comment on Facebook

I am so happy to hear that there are over 450. 🙂 The first year that they were released, one flew right across my path in Sam Marcos pass. It was thrilling!

Freedom Friday! It was a great day for this juvenile Red-tailed Hawk. He was brought to our clinic after being hit by a car. After a few weeks of recovery and building his stamina and strength by creancing he was ready for release 🙂.
Thanks to Sharon Blakely, one of our dedicated volunteers, for releasing this feisty hawk.

#freedomfriday #wildliferelease #backtothewild #wildliferescue #redtailedhawk #hawk #wildlife
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Comment on Facebook

Fast, huh?

Congratulations on another successful rehab and release! Fly free!

A little more challenging this week... what animal do you think this is from? Guess the animal! 😉

#wildlife #pacificwildlifecare #guesstheanimal
... See MoreSee Less

A little more challenging this week... what animal do you think this is from? Guess the animal! 😉

#wildlife #pacificwildlifecare #guesstheanimal

 

Comment on Facebook

Screech owl?

Great horned owl

Great horned owl

My first thought was a lesser nighthawk.

Nightjar?

GHO

I think it's an owl.....

Common poorwill?

Owl?

owl

Cooper’s Hawk

Cooper’s Hawk

WESO

Western Screech

WESO

Owl

Is it a swift?

Owl

Poorwill?

All I can say is that I expect a flat fly to pop out of there any minute now

Nightjar

Great guesses! This is a Common Poorwill we have in our care. Poorwills are rarely seen by people. They are nocturnal and their feathers resemble tree bark providing perfect camouflage as they rest on branches or in leaf litter during the day. These birds, about the size of a robin, can "hibernate" by slowing their metabolisms and entering a state called torpor. This can happen for long periods of time in cold weather allowing them to survive without food. This bird was accidentally hit with a weed whacker and suffered a shoulder wound and broken wing. He is doing well, his injuries are repaired and healed. Once his tail feathers grow back, he will be released.

Some type of owl....screech owl perhaps

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